Plastic Packaging Waste is at an all time high & is due to increase, India must act | Valdamark 

Asia consumes 50% of global plastic packaging, which could quadruple by 2050. Food, beverage and healthcare represent 75% of plastic packaging use.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.financialexpress.com

These numbers make for some pretty grim reading. 

 

In total Asia generates about 50% of plastic packaging globally. As if that were not enough it is forecast to go up 4x by 2025.

 

About 75% of the plastic waste generated is due to three primary markets. Healthcare, food & drink. 

 

The demand is forever increasing though as Asia’s appetite for home food delivery is on the up too. This change in buying conditions just mean more plastic is used. 

 

As if this wasn’t bad enough recycling is extremely low for all Asian countries except Japan who currently recycle about 83% of their waste. Compare that with near neighbors Taiwan who only manage about 35%. 

 

The Indian Ocean and China Seas contains an estimated 2.7 to 7.3 million tonnes per annum. 

 

Attention from the mainstream media and other outlets has combined to try to encourage government intervention and initiatives. Indeed the G10 initiative has made this issue a key discussion point. 

 

But action is what is needed! 

 

Australia, Japan & Taiwan have gone down the regulatory routes to monitor and penalize manufacturers who exceed plastic packaging limits. China & Indonesia have recently brought in fees for plastic bags. Mumbai the city in India has introduced a 5000 rupee fine for not recycling plastic bags and bottles. 

 

These steps however do not go as far as Korea who is looking to eradicate colored plastic bottles by 2020. Taiwan has taken the ambitious step to ban all plastic packaging by 2030.

 

Business needs to change. This will cost money with capital expenditure for expensive re-tooling and supply chain changes. Like adapting their packaging for export shipping.

 

But….

 

With it taking 500 years for one of these bottles to biodegrade can we afford not to. 

 

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